dec

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS
BUGS
AUTHOR
SEE ALSO

NAME

dec − convert dozenal numbers to decimal

SYNOPSIS

dec [-e] [-k precision ] [ dozenal number ]

DESCRIPTION

dec converts an arbitrary dozenal number, integral or fractional, into decimal. Accepts numbers in either standard or exponential notation.

If exponential notation is used in the input, it should consist of the mantissa, a lowercase ’e’, and the exponent. A ’-’ sign for negative signs is, of course, necessary; no ’+’ sign for positive exponents should be input.

Use a ’;’ for the zenimal point (that is, the point separating the integral from the fractional part). Note that most shells will interpret this as ending the command; consequently, if the number to be converted is input at the command line, one must put the number in quotation marks: "4;5".

Optionally takes its input as the final argument on the command line, or can take its input from standard input.

OPTIONS

-e

Write the output in exponential notation.

-k precision

Print the resulting output with precision digits of precision. By default, the output is printed with four digits after the zenimal point. If there is no fractional part, no zenimal point or fractional digits will be printed, even if this option is specified. If the precision is too high, a message will be printed noting this, and the precision will be reduced to the system’s maximum.

dozenal number

If present, must be the final argument at the command line. Converts the given number into decimal. As noted above, if this contains a zenimal point (’;’), the whole number must be in quotation marks: "4;5", not simply 4;5. Otherwise the shell will probably interpret the semicolon as the end of the command; in the example above, this will mean that "4" will be converted, and the shell will then complain that "5" is not a valid command.

BUGS

With very large numbers, fractional parts will get truncated. This is because the computer is only capable of representing numbers up to a given number of significant digits. This isn’t a bug, per se, but the program issues no warning for it, which probably is.

AUTHOR

Donald P. Goodman III <dgoodmaniii at gmail dot com>

SEE ALSO

doz(1), dozdc(1), tgmconv(1), dozdate(1), dozcal(1), dozword(1), dozpret(1)