dozpret

NAME
SYNOPSIS
DESCRIPTION
OPTIONS
ERRORS
BUGS
AUTHOR
SEE ALSO

NAME

dozpret − pretty-printing dozenal numbers

SYNOPSIS

dozpret [-lh] [-n number of digits between spaces ] [-s spacing character(s) ] [-p radix point character(s) ] [ number ]

DESCRIPTION

dozpret A dozenal number pretty-printer with sensible, reasonably international defaults, allowing customization including number of units, characters used to spaced between units, and characters used for the radix point ("." in decimal), as well as options for new transdecimal digits. It also provides some quick options for some common applications; e.g., formatting numbers for use in LaTeX documents. Assumes ’X’ and ’E’ as transdecimal digits and a Humphrey point (’;’) for a radix point in its input.

OPTIONS

-s

Indicates the character(s) used to space between units. In common American usage, this is the comma (","), like so: 186,700. Takes the character(s) desired as an argument, with or without a space; if multiple characters, put them in double quotation marks. Defaults to a space.

-n

Indicates the number of digits per spacing unit. Takes the integer desired as an argument, with or without a space. Any integer will do; negative integers will throw an error. Arbitrary size. Defaults to 4.

-p

Indicates the character(s) desired as a radix point. In decimal, this is usually the period ("."), such that it’s usually called the "decimal point". Dozenalists most commonly use the "Humphrey point," the semicolon (";"), and this is the default. Hammond points ("’") are also common. Takes the character(s) desired as an argument, with or without a space; if multiple charcters, put them in double quotation marks. Defaults to a Humphrey point (";").

-t

Indicates the character(s) desired to represent digit-ten; assumes ’X’ as the input. Takes as an argument the character(s) desired; if multiple characters, put them in double quotation marks. (As always, this is not strictly necessary for most characters in most shells; but it does avoid some annoying errors when one of the characters is something like ’;’ or ’\’.) Defaults to ’X’.

-e

Indicates the character(s) desired to represent digit-eleven; assumes ’E’ as the input. Takes as an argument the character(s) desired; if multiple characters, put them in double quotation marks. Defaults to ’E’.

-l

Format the number for LaTeX, or the way that I personally like my numbers formatted for LaTeX. This translates to a Humphrey point and a small space between units of four; equivalent to "-s "\," -t"\x" -e"\e"".

-a

Format the number according to normal American (decimal) conventions. This translates to a Humphrey point, with units of three digits separated by commas. Translates to "-n3 -s,".

-b

Format the number according to standard British dozenal practice (insofar as there is such a standard). This translates to a Hammond point and a ’T’ for digit-ten; it is equivalent to "-p"’" -tT".

-h

Format according to the Hammond standard; this is simply the use of a single quotation mark for the radix point, and translates to "-p"’"".

-x

Cancels the spacing entirely, but still does substitution for the transdecimal digits. This allows it to use the output of programs like dozdate in its input without screwing up their formatting.

-v

Print version and copyright information, then quit.

ERRORS

1

If the program returns "1", this means that there’s insufficient memory to process the string it’s been given.

BUGS

None known at this time.

AUTHOR

Donald P. Goodman III <dgoodmaniii at gmail dot com>

SEE ALSO

dec(1), doz(1), dozdc(1), tgmconv(1), dozdate(1), dozcal(1), dozword(1)